Hoi,
I know there are several Indian dictionaries and encyclopaedias for several languages that are available under a free license or where the copyright holder is seeking more exposure for its data / the language it has data for. My point is that particularly translation dictionaries provide an excellent basis for establishing a link to Wikidata and consequently such efforts will bring the benefits I describe.
Thanks,
     GerardM


On 5 January 2014 15:43, Vickram Crishna <vvcrishna@radiophony.com> wrote:

Could you explain, please, what you mean precisely by adding lexical data? An example?

Warmly

Vickram

On 5 Jan 2014 19:01, "Gerard Meijssen" <gerard.meijssen@gmail.com> wrote:
Hoi,
Getting content to the Internet is very much a chicken and egg problem. There is nothing and consequently nothing is added.

If we want to get more content in a language in a format that can help, Wikidata is a good bet. One of the strategies is to have volunteers work on content that has a big effect. One other strategy is by using lexical data and add this to Wikidata. 

A lexical approach is possible when the copyright holders of the data understand that their data gains value when it is actually used. By linking significantly into Wikidata several things are achieved:
  • information will become available thanks to automated disamibiguation and Reasonator
  • images can be found because of links to Commons categories
  • links to Wikipedia articles in other languages become available
It is relatively easy to add lexical data to wikidata. Many academic projects already link to several external sources and Wikidata is increasingly connected to such sources as well. It takes the ambition to do something for a language to make a difference.

By the way big and small languages will benefit from this kind of approach including English. 
Thanks,
     GerardM


On 31 December 2013 15:27, A. Mani <a.mani.cms@gmail.com> wrote:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0077056
__________________
Abstract: Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some
2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this
consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language
death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the
digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the
digital divide.
________________________



Best

A. Mani



A. Mani
[Last_Name. First_Name Format]
CU, ASL, AMS, ISRS, CLC, CMS
http://www.logicamani.in

_______________________________________________
Wikimediaindia-l mailing list
Wikimediaindia-l@lists.wikimedia.org
To unsubscribe from the list / change mailing preferences visit https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimediaindia-l


_______________________________________________
Wikimediaindia-l mailing list
Wikimediaindia-l@lists.wikimedia.org
To unsubscribe from the list / change mailing preferences visit https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimediaindia-l


_______________________________________________
Wikimediaindia-l mailing list
Wikimediaindia-l@lists.wikimedia.org
To unsubscribe from the list / change mailing preferences visit https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimediaindia-l