two weeks after my reply, i get an answer that it was rejected by a list moderator because it was 'too big' (I was unaware of any attachments?).

Anyway, hope my comments still make sense. Trying to re-send it now from another address.

Lodewijk

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Lodewijk <lodewijk@effeietsanders.org>
Date: 2014/1/12
Subject: Re: [Wikimania-l] Poster to present Wikimedia activities/projects/chapters/affiliates/tools...
To: "Wikimania general list (open subscription)" <wikimania-l@lists.wikimedia.org>


I recall that at wikimania 2006/2007/2008 there were poster sessions too, and that I was a bit disappointed about them. They were far away from where everything was happening, you had to actively go there and nobody was really motivated to read them.

So if a poster thingy is introduced again, I suggest to think about that as well - how to make it interactive, and how to only have interesting posters. Because if there are five boring posters, everyone will already walk away and never get to the awesome hard-work-posters on the other side of the room. I would have no objection against a threshold to ensure each poster is interesting and well designed.

All in all I think it would help if
* Not every poster is accepted, but only interesting ones
* There is some help in designing them in a way that they are clear, interesting, readable
* Some minimum design guidelines are created (for people who never make posters, or only those boring scientific ones - sorry scientists, but you know it's true for many of them...)
* Some interaction incentive, both for the presenter and the viewer. Maybe combine them with a discussion session, have a prize for the best poster or give free cookies. Be creative.

Anyway, just some thoughts :)

Lodewijk


2014/1/10 Edward Saperia <ed@originalcontentlondon.com>
At Wikimania 2013 the Wikidata team produced these cute little A5 leaflets that were really useful - they had a brief overview of the project, and then a bunch of entrypoints and contact details. The best thing about them was that you could slip them in your pocket, so when you were next at a computer you'd remember you were interested and could find the relevant URL.

This nicely also avoids the task of trying to fit the entire project onto one piece of paper; it's just an introduction and a physical reminder. As we all know, the real action happens online. I'm working on creating a template form that any project, big or small, can fill in, which the Wikimania team will then have designed up into booklets and print and present in the main foyer at Wikimania.

I think this is a nice alternative to posters. I'm going to great lengths to make Wikimania 2014 a very laptop friendly event, and I think leaflets suit this experience better.

You can see the design of the wikidata booklet, and sign up to be notified of when I've got the template ready to go, athttps://wikimania2014.wikimedia.org/wiki/Booklets

Ed Saperia
Co-ordinator in Chief
Wikimania London 2014

Creative DirectorOriginal Content London
133-135 Bethnal Green Road, E2 7DG